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Blogging Contest — Win a free Tea of the Month Club!

We invite you to participate in our blog and get the chance to win a Tea of the Month Club!  To enter the contest, leave a comment to this post.  You may talk about anything you want, as long as it relates to tea in some way that people might want to read about.  Please, no novels!  Keep it to 1000 words or less.  When we receive your submission, we’ll review it first before posting it to the blog.   On September 19th, we will review the submissions and pick the one we think is the best, and that person will win our Quarterly Tea of the Month Club, a $63.00 value! We will contact the winner via email, so please make sure your email address is entered correctly when you submit your article.

Need some ideas?  Discuss why you love tea, share a favorite tea memory you have, share the history of your favorite tea cup or other item, write a poem, tell us about your trip to China or England and how you enjoyed the tea there.

To get started, click on Comments, below!

11 comments to Blogging Contest — Win a free Tea of the Month Club!

  • Cindy

    There is definitely a nip of fall in the Wisconsin air…..the perfect weather for a “heavier” cup of tea in the afternoon while still being able to enjoy the porch swing with the dogs.

  • Stevie

    Tea parties seem to be a right of passage for female youth. Sure, boys can have tea parties if they so chose, but when the subject is brought up one can’t help getting an image of little girls in frilly party dresses and hats, pouring tea for their dolls. It’s an excuse to make adults dress in funny outfits and have a conversation with the cat like she’s a real person. Or to sit outside on a sunny day, dreaming of the future and what it could bring. Life long friends, alive or inanimate, are always remembered while sipping a cup of tea. And the fond memories of childhood will be there to put a smile on your face.

  • Kris

    Without tea, my dental checkups aren’t as good, so, as I tear out the door to school each morning, there’s a big mug of English Breakfast in one hand. By the time I get home from FRCC in the evening, it’s time for something mellow–maybe the lavender teas. During the day, you can bet I keep my tea mug going, so my brain will keep absorbing all the information!
    Then there’s the bedtime–and yes, tea again. Chamomile, or catnip, or one of the wonderful blends. Then there’s my Magic Tea Maker is a permanent part of my carry-on luggage, when I visit my granddaughter!

  • My father loved tea. Every day, he would make pot after pot of tea to drink. I can still remember the smell of the tea wafting through the kitchen after he had made a fresh pot. He introduced me to what tea was and how it was supposed to be. Always with a good black tea, he drank it straight. No sugar. No milk. The flavor of the tea was enough for him.

    After I moved away for college, I became interested in all types of tea. Black, white, green, oolong, or even red! I couldn’t get enough. I kept ordering more and more tea. This amazing world of flavors that my father had introduced me to held me in its clutches. I was hooked. Now, every time I take a sip of my favorite teas, I remember those days many years ago when my father introduced me to his favorite cup of tea.

  • I had the most horrendous week! I had an abcess in my tooth, had to have a root canal re-d0 and the medicine I took made my stomach hurt so much! The only thing that I found soothing to me for all the pain I was subjected to, was hot ginger peach tea. I held a cup of tea in my hands all day for over a week. I am better now, however, tea seems to still be the needful drink of choice!

  • Not counting water, tea is the #1 drink in the world—and for good reason. Tea can bring a friendship closer together, soothe the delivery of bad news, celebrate the arrival of good news. A cup of tea shared with a grandchild can provide memories that will not fade as the years go by, and a private tea-for-two can enhance the sparks of romance.

    Tea is suitable for every time of the day, because there are enough flavors and varieties in both regular and decaf to be right for all occasions. Herbal teas, too, must be counted, even though they are technically “tisanes” because they are not made from the actual tea plant.

    I enjoy tea at home and while traveling; with friends and family; in formal settings as well as casual ones. For a delicate Darjeeling, I may choose a fine china cup and saucer; for chai, perhaps a chunky pottery mug. There’s really no wrong way to drink tea!

  • Tina Lazicki

    “Taking tea together encourages an atmosphere of intimacy when you slip off the timepiece in your mind and cast your fate to the delight of tasty tea, tiny foods, and thoughtful conversation”…this quote I read in Chicken Soup For the Tea Lover’s Soul and I think it really captures the closeness that develops from sharing tea with someone. When I was small, my gram and I would make tea in a little brown ceramic teapot and while away the afternoon sipping tea, sharing cookies, and making memories that stay with me still even though it’s been about 28 years.

  • Keri Bowers

    Well, being from Oklahoma, where the waving wheat nearly blows you down most of the year, and the heat sucks all the moisture right out of you, I can think of nothing better to drink than iced tea. I don’t really care which flavor . . . I love them all. I used to use “store-bought” tea bags, which I’ve since learned is a big time no-no. Now, I brew my tea, sometimes where it tastes almost like hummingbird food, and pour it over ice to get me through our hot summers.

    I think my best tea story came from a number of years ago when I was in Massachusetts in October. I rented a car and drove around the countryside to sight-see. I stopped in a little deli/tavern close to the ocean to have a bite to eat. I ordered a nice, big glass of iced tea to go with my meal, and the waitress looked at me like I was insane. “Iced tea?, she asked. In October? Honey, we haven’t served iced tea since August!” Well, I felt just a wee bit silly, but by golly, I was going to have my iced tea! So, I asked for hot tea and a couple of glasses of ice. The poor girl truly thought I had lost my marbles.

  • Christine Jobe

    Tea! Just saying it and thinking about it makes me smile.
    My family was born in MA outside of Boston, in Medford and drinking tea, hosting tea parties and “sharing a cuppa” with my Mom on the weekends is a family tradition.

    I remember the Christmas I received my first tea set (which BTW I still have, cherish & is on display in my Dining Rm Hutch). I have many tea cups as does my Mom but we both have our favorite and she has a special set reserved for just us.

    We have a tradition of also hunting down new Tea shows and visiting while on vacation or for our birthday so I have been to many across the company.

    Tea is soothing, energizing, healthy and so much more. Right now my favorites include Jasmine Dragon Tears, Summer Place (a Hawiian blend) Jasmine Oolong, Scottish & Raspberry Tea.

  • Kristina

    I’m waiting in the South, impatient for Fall to arrive. Tea is never as pleasant as when I sip it bundled up next to a chilly open window with a cat on each sill, watching the leaves begin to turn.

  • I’ve been asked out for coffee more than a few times. I’ve said no. No one ever thinks to ask me out for tea.

    But if someone asked me out to tea, I would go, and this is how I think things would happen. We’d stand in line a bit awkwardly, squinting at the menu. He’d say something safe, and I would reply. I’ve already scrolled down in the browser of my brain to my selection: Loose Leaf Tea (hot).

    Their selection is around the corner from the register, three long tiers of tins the entire length of the counter. Theres is an impressive selection—it’s the only coffee shop in town with this many tea choices. I’ve long made up my mind, but the question boiling and steeping in me is what sort of tea will he choose? Which is he, really?

    Will he be a stiff black tea, an Assam or a Ceylon? Strong and full of energy, deep and mature. The warmth on chilly cold mornings, the strength to get up and face the day, with a dry sense of humor. He’ll come on a little too strongly sometimes, too abrasively, but he’d be exactly what I would need to keep awake and focused on reality.

    Or perhaps he’d reach for an Asian green tea, a Sencha, Lung Ching, or perhaps some Gunpowder Tea. Mellow he’d be, clean and clear and just a touch exotic. Cool and contemplative, though he turns a bit bitter when over-steeped in his own thoughts. He’d be quiet but able to hold his own in any sort of argument. He’d adapt to almost anything, but he’d always retain a clear sense of his foreignness—and be proud of it.

    He could go for Rooibos, the Red Bush tea. It’d be a cup of a different sort, sweeter and gentler, and a little nutty at times. He’d match up with lots of other flavors, very versatile and able to function at all times in all temperatures. His patience would be extreme—no matter how long or tightly he’d be stretched, he’d keep on coming with the same sweet taste and crazy sense of humor.

    I have to admit, I’d be a bit surprised if he were an Herbal. He’d be extremely unassuming, letting others take the spotlight while he quietly helps where he can. His mood might change with the seasons, he’d be very in tune with nature. Most of all though, he’d be calming and steadying, a rock to cling to amidst the jitters from everyone else and the stress of life. He’d be of no real help to get me going in the mornings, but he’d be there for me in the evenings to help me relax and unwind.

    Or an Oolong, ooooh. Suave and sophisticated, a gentleman with a high and complex taste to him. He’d be expensive, more so than me even, and for a while I’d probably think he’d be out of my league. He’d be temperamental, and tricky to brew up properly—it’d take me a few times before I’d be able to unlock his guarded heart and get into the true flavor underneath. He’d be harsh and unforgiving about mistakes, but quite vulnerable once his dapper front is stripped away. He’d need me, but he’d have a hard time letting me know.

    I’d watch his eyes travel over all the choices slowly, taking them all in. Oh, which will it be? His hand lifts a bit, hovers here, hovers there. He opens a few and peers inside, bemusedly. Choose, I’m dying to get to know you! His brow crunches a bit, in thought. Then he turns back to me.

    “Where’re the Lipton teabags?”

    And I’d soon be back home after struggling through the rest of our polite conversation, trying to wash the taste of tea-flavored disillusions out of my mouth.

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