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Tea and Trends

By John Rice, General Manager

In the ten plus years The Tea Table has been in business, tea has been steadily becoming more popular. The positive side is that there are more and more teas available. One of the down sides is that the quality of teas can, in general, steadily decline. While we are …continue reading

An Update on Tea and Caffeine

I’ve been hearing for a while that decaffeinating your tea at home by first brewing for 30 seconds or so, then re-brewing the same leaves in fresh water, does not actually work.  I have recommended this method in the past, and I see it suggested all the time by all sorts of tea authorities, so …continue reading

“I’m looking for a tea that will cure my condition. What do you recommend?”

"I'm looking for a tea that will cure my condition.  What do you recommend?"  This is a fairly common inquiry that we receive, and I'd like to address it because it requires a bit of explanation instead of the short answer hoped for. Usually people who ask us this question are brand new to tea. …continue reading

How much tea should I buy at once?

A 1-2 month supply is a good starting point for most people. If you are really set on one or two teas and you are confident you will continue to like them and drink them daily, you may get a year’s supply at one time. One pound of tea makes roughly 200 cups, so that …continue reading

How to avoid bitter tea

By John Rice, General Manager. When a customer is brewing loose tea for the first time, they sometimes comment that it came out tasting bitter. Unlike most bag teas, high quality loose teas require more care in brewing, and how to do this properly will vary with the particular tea being made. This is why …continue readingcontinue reading

What is the best way to store tea?

Tea will easily get stale if stored improperly, and can sometimes even spoil. For best flavor retention, tea needs to be kept in an air-tight, dark, and dry environment, ideally at a constant temperature and away from odors. Because tea leaves are dried, they are prone to absorbing moisture and aromas of nearby items. Light …continue reading

What temperature water is best for brewing tea?

In general, freshly boiled water is appropriate for black and herbal teas, but steaming (sub-boiling) is best for green, oolong, and white teas.   A lot of people use boiling water all the time and report their tea tastes fine.  Ultimately, your taste preferences are all that matter, so feel free to experiment a bit with …continue reading

How can I get my tea to taste stronger (or weaker)?

The best way to control the strength of your tea is the alter the amount of tea leaves you use rather than changing the brew time. People will often try to let their tea brew a long time to get a strong cup, only to find it tastes bitter. To get the best flavor, you …continue reading

How long do I steep (or brew) the tea?

This can vary significantly from tea to tea, but there are rules of thumb. In general, black tea needs to brew 3-5 minutes for best flavor. They will often get bitter if you let them brew more than 6 or 7 minutes (some much sooner). Green tea often needs only 1 minute, but 2-3 minutes …continue reading

How big is a tea cup?

A tea cup is considered to be 6 fluid ounces, like a coffee cup. So when we say to use 1 tsp. of leaves per cup, if your cup is 8 ounces, you may need to use a bit more leaves to get a full strength cup.